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career, -- i'm new to cable. -- you are the yo chief technology officer at -- >> correct. >> there in the -- my role at hp, we focused a lot on what the people do with the technology in their homes and in their hands and on their desk. being able to look at that from end to end. an innovator by back and. it is about coming up with those great i years and translating those two have high impacts. >> what are some products that you are excited about? >> we have been looking at all of the programs that we have currently running. we narrowed it down to key focus areas. one is the technology. commercially, we have been upwards of megabits. we will see 300. we announced work on 3.1 which is technologies out of cable lab that will allow cable operators to offer you 10 gig. you will start seeing that as we get those technologies refined. we are seeing that progression. better technologies on the network side. giving you more capacity to watch those videos and communicate with friends and all kinds of things. >> is that going to take new hardware and wires in the home? >> no. the c
that these revenues that you seek also come from the creativity of individuals that create technology, the kind of technology that needs to be acquired by the technology industry, for example. also many other sources of revenue. we just want to point out that sometimes the talented scientists and clinicians of the nih feel hampered by some of the policies and rules that come our way. we offer our help in any way that we can to try to work together with you to figure out ways to ensure the maximum creativity of a federal scientists so that the american people can get the most of their investment. >> thank you. we all have to be at the table. we need your input. we have tried to work with the same set of facts. there is 1.2 trillion dollars of tax expenditures, that was a one-year number. the problem we have with sequestration is that it is two trillion over 10 years. the annual tax expenditure number is 10 times that amount. the upper 1% of income earners in this country get about 25% of tax expenditure benefits. so, there is room for changes in our tax code that will be encouraged the type of c
to develop radiation. >> new things have to be sent into space. >> a lot of new things. the technology from that then goes out and stimulate the world economy like apollo and early space programs stimulated the economy of the world. i got an iphone on my hip that has 2000 times the memory of an apollo computer. can you imagine? the space station guys, they have texts, skype or something up there. and they're all on their laptops. it boggles your mind what is going on there technologically. >> today you could probably tweet what is going on on your flight. on your first and only flight, on the way back to earth, you got to do spacewalk. >> it was totally different. a different experience. as i described being on the moon, it contrasts the gray lunar surface with the blackness of space. people ask me what does the earth like from the moon? i said i cannot tell you because i landed in the center of the moon which took the earth directly overhead. in an apollo space suit, it is like being in a fishbowl. you move your head but the helmut does not move. so i did not get to see the earth very much
$51 million to assist locals in paying for technology transition upgrades in schools across the state a substantial and strategic investment in our schools. [applause] another $34 million is budgeted to address ongoing capital needs that can be used for increased security measures if local officials decide to do so. and more than $35 million is budgeted for teacher salaries. we're also providing $22 million for a new high school for the tennessee school for the deaf in knoxville. our administration's three budgets have certainly supported our commitment to public education, but i also think it's important to note that we're not just throwing money at it. dollars alone don't lead to improvement. there has to be a plan. along with strategic investments, we're pursuing real reform in education that is producing results. we've addressed tenure so that a principal doesn't have to decide after three years to either fire a teacher or grant tenure. there is now a five year time period for the principal to use data more effectively to assess a teacher's performance and then allow time to give
are not necessarily always good at. we have to find ways to combine this with social technology so we have social technical systems up the large corporate level, national community level, and on the very front lines of value creation. i first got involved in this. about national oil policy 30 some odd years ago and i spent some time working for toyota before they brought the system to the united states. i worked in toyota city to help transfer systems to the united states. i have done that over the years. as we went through a process of determining what skills are necessary and it won wonderful consensus is the fact that we need a good education. community colleges are still very important. the one pressure we have as we started working with uaw, general motors, to find the right kind of employees to work in a system was team-based problem solving and this goes back 30 years ago. this is not new. i do not think the equation has changed now that we're bringing a lot of manufacturing back. i think it is a matter of how we have come to understand the cost of living things overseas without understand
and technology that will allow us to put more people back to work repairing our crumbling roads and bridges. this will help businesses expand and create new jobs. we need to provide every american with the skills and training they need to fulfill those jobs. let's start in their earliest years by offering high-quality recent goal to every child in america. they will be -- to every pre-s chool child in america. we cannot subsidize the soaring costs of education. we need to determine which colleges received certain types of federal aid. there are steps we can take to bring good jobs to america and equip people with skills those jobs require. that leads to the third question -- how do we make sure hard work leads to a decent living? no one should work full-time and raise their children in poverty. let's raise the minimum wage so it is a wage that you can live on. let's pass a comprehensive immigration reform. let secure our borders and establish a responsible path to earned citizenship and attract highly skilled entrepreneurs and engineers that will help create jobs. the steps will help grow t
to talk about fiber. there is technology available today where each individual home could be self-sufficient -- self-sufficient with its own energy sell. what is amazing is if we have 500 years of natural gas, there it is. nobody can attack us if every household has energy. we eliminate the grid because everyone has the wrong grade. there is a company in california that is powering e day using methane gas. that company is blue energy of california. host: the president signed an executive order last week regarding cyber security. some news about that, they intended to improve information sharing to establish a framework of cyber security best practices. "the white house spent the last several months crafting the order after congress failed to pass cyber security legislation last year. -- last year." we will talk more about this executive order at 8:30 with larry clinton, president and ceo of the internet security alliance. next, gil, missouri, democratic line. caller: it does not surprise me , an executive order once a month on something. in 1913 they passed a 17th amendment. the s
, and she shared her insights on the direction of new technology. she is the youngest ceo of a fortune 500 company. the world economic forum brings together thousands of liters in business. this is about half an hour. >> welcome to "insight and ideas with marissa mayer." the c.e.o. of yahoo! if i am not mistaken, this is the first such conversation since becoming ceo. >> that's right. >> well, it is an honor for both me and the economic forum. e're here to talk about the future of technology. let's begin with the one nut that no one seems to be able to crack. the platform shift from desktop to mobile. how do you crack that nut? >> it is really important. if you look at what is happening in terms of the shift to mobile, the number of mobile phones has tripled in five years. tablet sales will out-sell laptops this year if predictions hold true. it is really incredibly important. a lot of consumers are making the shift. one is understanding how this works, what this provides. and how we can benefit user expectations. the other piece is monetization. whenever you see a consumer shift of this t
are still without a plan that was originally envisioned. arizona border's technology development remains in question. according to the jo, the department does not have the information necessary to support the estimated $1.5 billion plan, which is the successor to the council's multibillion-dollar fbi net. the department has not demonstrated the effectiveness in deploying surveillance technology. the jo also found that $1.5 billion cost estimate may not be reliable. if this new plan goes awry, the department will have spent over two billion dollars in an attempt to develop technology with little more to show them cancel programs and canceled checks the contractors. this is but one example why the department must go through this acquisition system, to improve how it does its job analysis and make sure we have a better way of purchasing technology. the new administration has made some improvement, the newly created accountability and risk- management designed to manage the oversight acquisition program appears to be a step in the right direction. i am concerned only 45 staff in this office
about it. that helps it -- us think through the problem. technology is still really important. the biggest challenge for the army from a technology perspective is this trade-off between mobility, survivability, and lethality. we found in afghanistan and iraq, because of low-tech weapons we lost our survivability. sorry tom a -- sorry, because we had to focus on mobility. we had to stay on roads. from a technological standpoint, we need people to start thinking about this. we need development and materials, we need to develop new ideas and how we can conduct operations and lethal operations. the last thing we talk about is -- leadership is the key going forward. i believe that in the future, it is about intergovernmental multinational environment. it is the ability of her leaders to operate in this environment, -- our leaders to operate in this environment and be able to move through this. what i have learned in the last 10 years is, it is not about what happened. it is about why it happened. once you figure out why it happened, you can come up with the right combination of sol
it -- us think through the problem. technology is still really important. the biggest challenge for the army from a technology perspective is this trade-off between mobility, survivability, and lethality. we found in afghanistan and iraq, because of low-tech weapons we lost our survivability. sorry tom a -- sorry, because we had to focus on mobility. we had to stay on roads. from a technological standpoint, we need people to start thinking about this. we need development and materials, we need to develop new ideas and how we can conduct operations and lethal operations. the last thing we talk about is -- leadership is the key going forward. i believe that in the future, it is about intergovernmental multinational environment. it is the ability of her leaders to operate in this environment, -- our leaders to operate in this environment and be able to move through this. what i have learned in the last 10 years is, it is not about what happened. it is about why it happened. once you figure out why it happened, you can come up with the right combination of solutions to fix the probl
that you have coordinated on cooperations, technology, human resources, and maybe legal financial activities, but we know little about your knowledge of that committees -- activities of which you are the chief operating officer. some of the units of activity included trading and sales and marketing of risky investments. if you knew about the marketing and sales of these investments, it would be instructive to know what you do. if you do not know, it would be instructive to find out why and find out what your responsibilities were during her years at ci -- years at citi. these are important questions. if you are confirmed -- if you are confirmed, you will be responsible for overseeing the implementation of the very practices undertaken by the city units that you once operated. for example, you will be responsible for coordinating a limitation of the so-called -- volkcker rule. you have stated that you support that rule. if you are to be confirmed, it could lead to an awkward situation in which your rule as chair you would effectively be saying, financial firms, do as i say and not
with the vetting process and something is wrong with technology that it is not working in the marketplace. i had solar panels on my house in tennessee as a test keys thursday as a test case 30 + years ago. they're looking to see if we could get enough heat units per day in solar panels. we never got enough to run our hot water heater. we were happy to do it and see if it worked. we are saying let's bring things to the marketplace that will work but let's let the market decided it does not have to be taxpayer money that is being used as venture capital to see if unproven technologies are going to work. host: "from the washington post." what do you think of those proposals? guest: i think we need to look very carefully at wind power. are we generating a lot of wind power and the answer to that is, across the country, some areas are successful and some are not. you take our area in tennessee and you look at tva and the electric power generation source and see what you are pulling in that electric power generation bred from wind power and it is a miniscule amount. , even on the best days. you have
and something is wrong with technology that it is not working in the marketplace. i had solar panels on my house in tennessee as a test keys thursday as a test case 30 + years ago. they're looking to see if we could get enough heat units per day in solar panels. we never got enough to run our hot water heater. we were happy to do it and see if it worked. we are saying let's bring things to the marketplace that will work but let's let the market decided it does not have to be taxpayer money that is being used as venture capital to see if unproven technologies are going to work. host: "from the washington post." what do you think of those proposals? guest: i think we need to look very carefully at wind power. are we generating a lot of wind power and the answer to that is, across the country, some areas are successful and some are not. you take our area in tennessee and you look at tva and the electric power generation source and see what you are pulling in that electric power generation bred from wind power and it is a miniscule amount, even on the best days. you have to questioned that. you'll n
is happening to the jobs being created in wind and solar and waves and algae technology? what's going to happen to the electric car. no. we need to say yes to science and technology, yes to our health and our future. yes to local economies being able to sustain and say yes, we have clean water, we have vegetables, we have meat that is not -- animals that are not dying and fish not rising to the top of the lakes because of ground water coming up with methane and all the chemicals, most of which we don't even have disclosed to us to know. no gag orders on us to tell us. this is what we need. we need transparency. we need real information. we don't need the same advertising companies who told us it was ok to smoke and hospitals telling us that fracking is safe. no. we didn't believe you then. we don't believe you now. no fracking, no tar sands, yes on innovative technology for our future. we're not inheriting trillions of dollars of debt and water we can't drink. food we can't eat. no. so thank you so much for making this issue front and center, making sure that he understands and all the other le
for joining us. a few things about the history of this place. there have been many technological changes over the years. the first radiobroadcast was in 1923. the first evening speech was in 1965, with lyndon johnson. the first live web cast was in 2002. it was first televised in hd in 2004. tonight, in addition to internet streaming, both the white house and the republicans have put out second screen experiences, with lots of information. the shortest speech, was president washington. the longest was william howard taft, 27,651 words. we are going to stop talking right now and let you get the sense of inside the house of representatives chamber as the event unfolds. there is always one missing cabinet member. secretary chu is the first in of succession, waiting in a closed location -- in the line of succession, waiting in a close location who elsewhere. after the speech, we will be here immediately by a republican response. the next of the night is devoted to you, what you have heard from washington tonight. leman from oregon, mr. walden. the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. lankford. the gentle
opportunity for us. >> the future of consumer technology with samsung vp for strategy david steel from this year's ces show. >> president obama and congressional leaders spoke about faith in public life at this year's fellowship foundation national prayer breakfast in washington. the national prayer breakfast dates back to 1953 with president eisenhower. otheralso hear from guests. this is 90 minutes. ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states and mrs. michelle obama. ♪ [applause] >> a good morning. we have had a wonderful time together to discuss issues and had a joyful time together. we thank you for your attention. mark, is overwhelming -- you can all have a seat, i'm sorry. please have a seat. >> you never know. >> it is overwhelming to think of the pathway that each person took to get to this event today. some from little villages halfway around the world, and some from the 12 blocks away. thank you all for coming. this year's event, which has taken place for 61 years now, began with a group of people who happen to be leaders wanting to get togeth
technology, mobile brand -- broadband providers. i am sure all the smartphones and tablets of of the trucking industry and oil and gas is probably using more. anything the panel can say generally about the continued growth in mobile broadband and technology generally? >> certainly from a trucking perspective, gas, it has been absolutely critical to our industry over the last decade or so. the days of drivers going to pay phones and calling in to find the next load, now it pops up and tell them exactly where to go and when to be there and so forth. i think there is still a lot of penetration -- the penetration is probably not all the way there yet in trucking and there are a lot of opportunities. that is something they are willing to invest in and because it impacts their bottom-line. >> i would agree. the ability of well drillers to capture what is going on in terms of logs and distributed to a central location for analysis , and understanding what is going on, is really central to moving forward to develop our energy resources much more quickly and efficiently. >> when bob mentioned payphone
he talks about. but his focus is not just about digital technology. he is taking the venerable institution and journalism and looking at them informed by his deep knowledge of digital technology and also with a different set of values that are more traditional. it is my great pleasure to welcome you here. the changing media landscape, smart news in the age of social media. glad to have you. >> thank you. [applause] it is particularly nice to be back across the street from the house where we started facebook nine years ago yesterday. february 4, 2004, is where we open it up. we woke up and there were hundreds of people on it already. and i thought i would talk a little bit to give you a context on what we are doing at "the new republic" and how i see the digital media landscape in 2013 and then open it up for questions and hopefully get a good dialogue going. the first question people ask me all the time is, why would someone like you buy this 100- year-old media institution like "the new republic" in an age when the wisdom is, print is dying, serious journalism is under threat,
us think through the problem. you know, in terms of technology -- you know, technology is still really importantly. you know, for the army, the biggest challenge we have from a technology perspective is this tradeoff between mobility, survivability and lethalbility. and what we found in afghanistan and iraq, because of low tech weapons, we lost our survivability. excuse me, we lost our mobility, because we had to focus on survivability. and so our ability to be mobile was taken away from us, because we had to put so much stuff on our existing vehicles, it may them heavy, they were no longer maneuverable. they had to stay on roads. that's not what we need in the future. from a technological standpoint, we need development in materials, we need to develop new ideas in how we can conduct operations and lethal operations, be more mobile and the last thing is is that we talk about is this is why i focus on leadership. in my mind, leadership is the keep going forward. -- key going forward and it's because i believe that in the future, it's about the joint interagency, intergovernmenta
the research and technology that helps natural gas burn even cleaner and protects our air and water. indeed, much of our new-found energy is drawn from lands and waters that we, the public, own together. so tonight, i propose we use some of our oil and gas revenues to fund an energy security trust that will drive new research and technology to shift our cars and trucks off oil for good. if a non-partisan coalition of ceos and retired generals and admirals can get behind this idea, then so can we. let's take their advice and free our families and businesses from the painful spikes in gas prices we've put up with for far too long. i'm also issuing a new goal for america -- let's cut in half the energy wasted by our homes and businesses over the next twenty years. [applause] the states with the best ideas to create jobs and lower energy bills by constructing more efficient buildings will receive federal support to help make it happen. america's energy sector is just one part of an aging infrastructure badly in need of repair. ask any ceo where they'd rather locate and hire -- a country with de
in huntsville, alabama. a community he loved very much. julian started davidson technologies in 1996 with just two employees. julian davidson emerged as a leading figure in the tennessee valley and believed if everyone worked for the betterment of the community, regardless of personal gain, everyone benefited. julian sought to leave our community and country better than he found it and he did that. julian davidson is a former chairman of the air force studies board of the national research council, member of the defense sciences board, and vice chairman of the technology assessment committee of the united states -- united space command, for national research council. julian davidson twice received the army exceptional civilian service award. he has received the air force meritorious civilian service award, the nba pioneer award -- m.b.a. pioneer award, he's a member of the employee hall of fame, united technology hall of fame, and was with auburn alumni engineering council. his impact on america is enormous. he is known by many as the father of missile defense in america. julian davidson is su
. >> the future of consumer technology with samsung vice president for strategy david steel from this year's consumer electronics show. monday night on a c-span2. rex british prime minister david cameron took questions from members of the house of commons during his weekly question time session on the state of the british economy, housing benefits, and the passing of the same sex marriage failed. on tuesday, members voted overwhelmingly in favor of the bill, 400-175. this is just over 30 minutes. >> to the prime minister. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties i shall have further such meetings later today. >> thanking my right honorable friend to that answer, and having given the honorable friend notice -- particularly fair and transparent, and modern, can my right honorable friend say that in response to the many concerns in yesterday's debate, that civil partnerships are open to heterosexual couples on an equal basis with homosexual couples? >> i am grateful to my wonderful friend and forgiving the these questions.
-- the technological edge of the future, the ability to have force protection and force projection in the pacific, in the middle east, the ability to have a presence elsewhere in the world, to have rotational deployment capabilities that can exercise and train other countries and develop their capabilities so that they too can provide security. the ability to defeat more than one enemy at a time, the ability to invest in the future. invest in unmanned systems in space and cyber, invest in special forces, invest in the ability to mobilize quickly, invest in the ability to maintain a strong industrial base in this country so that we can have a strong defense for the future. putting those elements together was the result of a team effort by both the military and the civilian work force here and i deeply appreciate their working as a team to put that in place. because of the progress that we've been able to achieve, particularly with our troops, we've ended the war in iraq, we've given the iraqi people a chance to be able to secure and govern themselves. in afghanistan we're doing exactly the same th
world. it is not due to a breakthrough in military technology or new strategic insight. it is not because of entitlement growth has been explored and exhausted. it is not because sequestration was ever land or intending to be implemented during -- ever planned or intended to be implemented. the consequences are very real and very personal. the president has indicated his intention to spare military compensation from sequestration. it is a decision that we intend to carry out, but make no mistake, the troops will feel this directly in other ways. i will give you the principal way. we will need to sharpen curtail training. that means a brigade combat team that has returned from afghanistan that is used to being in tip top ready, that is what matters to the profession and that is what we want to have matter to them, cannot train. the army reports that two thirds of its brigade on that teams will be at reduced readiness by year's end. i could go through the same thing with air force and so forth. it will have a big impact on uniformed people. likewise for our much-maligned
, ongoing teacher training, school safety, technology, and programs like after-school and tutoring that prevent drop-outs by helping struggling students catch up. in postsecondary education, we've reduced funding by $166 million since 2008, leading to higher tuition, increased class sizes, fewer academic programs and course offerings, delayed repairs, more reliance on part- time teachers and lay-offs. last budget, we lifted $24 million from lottery proceeds to keep the general fund balanced -- money that would have gone to financial aid. we'll also need money for new debt service for critical maintenance projects, to reduce caseloads for social workers and for health insurance. and then, we need to start looking at fully funding all-day kindergarten, expanding preschool to reach more 3- and 4-year-olds, as well as increasing substance-abuse treatment. [applause] meanwhile, state employees haven't had a pay raise in four years -- and most of them had furlough days. so my friends, anticipated revenue growth will not be rigorous enough to transform this state. again, that's not rhetor
economics, aid, and technology. she enhanced the role of diplomatic and defense initiatives in the international arena. capitalizing on this effort, it she instituted a diplomacy and developmental review for the department that mirrored the defense review to all our endeavors. secretary clinton' success in the department of state resulted in an expanded role of global issues and greatly facilitated the respect of military groups on every continent. visiting more than 100 countries. she has been an exceptional example of the commitment to fostering better relations abroad and to directly supporting our troops in those areas. most noteworthy in her years of federal service, she has instantly and an advocate of all personal programs and initiatives that have enhanced the lives of military personnel and their families. her accomplishments reflect upon herself, the joint staff, and the department of defense. [applause] please be seated. ladies and gentlemen, the 23rd secretary of defense, leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you. what a great honor to be able to recognize this very
. it does not in reaction to a more peaceful world. it is not due to a breakthrough in military technology or strategic insight. it is not because paths in entitlement has been explored and exhausted. it is not because sequestration was a plan ever plan to be implemented. this is the collateral damage of political gridlock. for the troops, the consequences are very real and very personal. the president has indicated his intentions to spare military compensation from sequestration. that is a very good decision. it is one that we intend to carry out. make no mistake -- the troops will fill this directly. i will give you the principal example. there are many. we will need to sharply curtail training in all the services. for example, a brigade combat team that has returned from afghanistan that is used to being tiptop ready. that is what matters to this profession. the army reports two thirds of its brigade combat teams will be at reduced readiness by year 's end. to do the same with the air force and so forcorth. it will have a big effect for people in uniform. also civilians, and people thin
on science, technology, engineering, and math. the skills today employers are looking for to fill the jobs that are there right now and will be there in the future. even with better high schools, those young people will need higher education. it is a simple fact. the more education you have got , the more likely you are to have a good job and work your way to the middle class. but today's skyrocketing costs price too many people out of a higher education or saddle them with unsustainable debt. through tax credits, grants, and better loans, we have made college more affordable for millions of students and families over the past few years. but taxpayers cannot keep on subsidizing higher and higher costs for higher education. colleges must do their part to keep costs down, and it is our job to make sure that they do. [applause] so tonight i ask congress to change the higher education act so that affordability and value are included in determining which colleges receive certain types of federal aid. and tomorrow my administration will release a new college scorecard for parents and students to
to hold jobs in high wage and high skill field like information technology, health care and manufacturing in the 21st century. for this time of record high unemployment, career and technical education provide the lifeline to the unemployed who look to be alongside young adults just out of high school in the rapidly evolving job market. career in technical education, while historically undervalued, provides an opportunity for america to remain globally competitive. while also engaging students in practical, real-world applications of academics coupled with hands on work experience. now, as we move towards fiscal year 2014, i join with a bipartisan group of my colleagues, and not only recognizing the importance of maintaining these federal investments for our country's future but also saying thank you to the countless men and women who make these programs possible. the faculty, the teachers, the instructors within the career -- our career and technical education schools throughout this great mation. mr. speaker, as we celebrate career and technical education month, i encourage my colleagues
technology with samsung vice- president david steele. that is tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern on the communicators on c-span2. >> having observed a steady improvement in the opportunities and well-being of our citizens, i can report to you, the state of this old by youthful union is good. >> once again, in keeping with a time honored tradition, i've come to report you on the state of the union. i am pleased to report that america is much improved and there is good reason to believe that improvement will continue. >> my duty to night is to report on the state of the union, not the state of our government, but our american community. and to set forth our responsibilities, in the words of our founders, "to form a more perfect union." the state of the union is wrong. >> as we gather tonight, our nation is at war. our economy is in recession. and the civilized world faces unprecedented dangers. yet the state of our union has never been stronger. >> it is because of our people that our future is hopeful, our journey goes forward. and the state of our union is wrong. >> tuesday, pres
is to change the way we do business. using commonsense, proven technology, stretching our tax dollars, and making our communities more livable. we can start by not pressuring the corps of engineers to complete the levees, spending millions of dollars we don't have on a solution that will make the problem worse. let's work instead to understand the impacts of global warming and extreme weather and then do something about it. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from kentucky, mr. whitfield, for five minute. mr. whitfield: thank you very much, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, tonight in this house chamber president obama will give his state of the union address to a joint session of congress. article 2, section 3 of the constitution requires that the president, whomever it may be, shall, from time to time, give to congress information on the state of the union. george washington, the first president, addressed the joint session of congress. but thomas jefferson and each succeeding president up until 1913, presented a written statement of the st
to encourage the research and technology that helps natural gas burn even cleaner and protects our air and water. indeed, much of our new-found energy is drawn from lands and waters that we, the public, own together. so tonight, i propose we use some of our oil and gas revenues to fund an energy security trust that will drive new research and technology to shift our cars and trucks off oil for good. if a non-partisan coalition of ceos and retired generals and admirals can get behind this idea, then so can we. let's take their advice and free our families and businesses from the painful spikes in gas prices we've put up with for far too long. i'm also issuing a new goal for america -- let's cut in half the energy wasted by our homes and businesses over the next twenty years. [applause] the states with the best ideas to create jobs and lower energy bills by constructing more efficient buildings will receive federal support to help make it happen. america's energy sector is just one part of an aging infrastructure badly in need of repair. ask any ceo where they'd rather locate and hire --
to that? >> two fronts. telephone penetration as well as access to technology, broadband extensions that are in indian country. both are critical. one for safety and security reasons. we have been working with the various departments having to deal with making sure we have access to 911. it was only a couple years that the former chair tax relief finally got access to 911. this is in california. we know this is a prevalent problem. >> anyone else? >> other questions? there in the back? >> [indiscernible] from california. we are not a federally recognized tribes. i am only 25. i did five years in the marine corps. lance corporal. [applause] i would like to know what is the process for federal recognition -- recognize asian and why have we not had help. i would like to see there is leadership from congress. thank you. >> that is a great question. i want to thank you for that. let me state, pa ncai is an inclusive organization. there is a federal recognition process tribes go through to become an gain that federal recognition or to be recognized by the federal government. some of these
. simply by investing in new technologies, new turbines, only 3% of the dams in the country produce electricity. we could also in this process create 700,000 jobs. unleashing american ingenuity to increase hydropower production will lower energy costs and help create thousands of jobs. mr. chairman, i urge all of my colleagues to support american energy, support h.r. 267 and i thank you and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from new mexico is recognized. mr. lujan: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. lujan: h.r. 267 is a bipartisan bill that will facilitate the development of new, environmentalry -- environmentally responsible means of power. it was developed through a cooperative process that included discussions with interested stake holders and agencies this process was produced in a balanced, bipartisan way and it is bipartisan legislation. the legislation is supported by both hydropower developer and environmentalists. it was unanimously reported out of the en
in the sciences, technology, engineering and math fields so they are prepared for high-tech and high-paying jobs for the future. stem education is vital for the economic growth of my district and for the nation. just atlanta month a new report found that in the past 11 years high-tech jobs in my district and the surrounding areas have grown by 18.6%, many of these jobs requiring engineers and students to pursue stem education. yet, while most parents of school-age students believe that stem education should be a priority in the united states, only half agree it is actually a top priority. mrs. negrete mcleod: that's why i ask my colleagues to support national engineers week to raise awareness of stem education and its importance to our country's economic future. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from kansas rise? >> mr. speaker, i rise today to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today
always been a great proponent of science, technology, and innovation, and as he concludes his service to the house, it is only fitting to cite the words of alfred lord tennieson as inscribed on the -- lord tennyson as inscribed on the walls of the house science and technology committee. quote, for i dipped into the future as far as human eyes could see, saw a vision of the world and all the wonder that would be. over nearly four decades serving the congress, john has always kept his sights and his vision firmly on the future. he believed and he knew that the future is about investing in our children, supporting working families, strengthening the middle class. he knew that the future is about protecting our environment and preserving our planet for generations to come. john knew that the future of the house is strengthened by fellow staff members working in a bipartisan way. john has always respected the role -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman will suspend. the house is not in order. the gentlewoman may continue. ms. pelosi: thank you, madam speaker. john has always respected
do. they wondered that about him then. of course the new technology then was roofment and it turned out radio was a blessing for him because he had a little bit of wire in his voice and it cut through apparently a very good radio voice. he thought he was on radio there and he read as though on the roofment his personality comes through. >> the chapter they thought was most i lum nating about him as a person and i'm not sure you pronounce it this way, the ode den, what is that chapt ter >> this is when you get to college, the outsider that's greek. he happened to go to a college that had a motto let them lum nate the earth. a college for future ministers, generally congregationist although there were others there. and he went down there and at the time it was a greek school. ed the a lot of fraternities and most kids were in them. and what is interesting about calvin, and this is all the way through his life, he didn't seem like he was going to make it. he got there and thought he should be in one, he wrote his letter saying something about that and then he wasn't chosen. so imagine
. with a great technology base. weaver great research base. we still have an immense -- we have a great research base. we have immense advantages. i think we're going to be fine but we have to learn to compare ourselves with the competition in a way that is nonthreatening and non- negative. we have to have a jobs agenda that is realistic and we need a 10-year budget plan that does not overdo the austerity. because when interest rates go up, you can see we are going to have impose austerity because we cannot stay as 7% of the budget with the debt this big with reasonable interest rates. and do it all in the same spirit that you took out in this last election. i think you will be fine. is a great time to be in public service. there is no reason to be negative about the future. but now that you won this race that with the referendum and a -- in large measure on what the american people did not want, we have to create a future that thehy do want. = = they do want. thank you very much. [applause] >> now conversation with former ohio republican conve congressman. this is 35 minutes. host: we want to w
universities and technology firms. last year firms working on everything from improving cancer diagnostics to protecting our computer security received more than $130 million from the national science foundation and $850 million from the national institutes of health. in all san diego received more than 1,760 grants. i recently received a letter from a rising therapeutics, a small biomedical group in my district. this small team of dedicated researchers have been working against the flu and fever. if the sequester goes into effect they have to lay off researchers. this will not only hurt jobs, families, it will stop critical research in the biomedical sciences and stifle innovation in our labs and universities. congress must act now so that america and san diego do not fall behind our international competitors and so we continue to be on the cutting edge of technology. we must keep investing in our future. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: are there further one-minute requests? hearing no other requests, the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the cl
out a way to change it. with the rapid advances in technology, from a daily basis ,cyber-bullying, how much worse is that going to be in another 10 years? we have lost the ability to communicate with our children. how many of you ask your children each day when they get home from school, "how was your day?" what is their standard answer? "fine, good, okay." and then what? they get on the computer, do their homework, whatever. that is not communicating. they tell us that because that is what they think we want to hear. they don't think we really care. around thet dinner supper table anymore. we eat in front of the television. it is time we actually sit down and hold those conversations with our children. we ask those hard questions. "how was your day today? what good thing happened to you? what bad thing happened?" we have got to learn to communicate with our kids again. i spoke in front of a group of 300 school counselors a while back. i asked how many of them were ever bullied or picked on. over 300 people in there, 270 had their hand in the air. i told them if they were bullied this
butch other incentives to develop new forces of technology -- he has introduced other incentives to develop new sources of technology. >> so they would pay more in taxes? >> will be part of tax reform. there will be some special provision that have to be eliminated so everyone can get a lower rate. >> i am amazed but let's move on. we talked about the level of federal spending. the 40 year norm, the federal government spends roughly 20% of our gdp. during the clinton years, the average spending level was 19.8%. under the obama administration, it has been 24.4%. revenue has been at 15%. hence the deficit difference between revenues and the amount of the federal government keeps spending. in might meeting, you did slot -- you declined to consider what you would think as a sure the new normal be what it currently is, 24.4%? >> i do not think the current situation is the new normal. we are at the end of a recovery from a deep recession with extreme reductions in revenue and more spending because of economic conditions. as we look ahead, we have to recognize what is driving costs. 30
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